BOOK RIOT
As the day (and then night) went on, I got better at summing up what is, for me, an un-sum-uppable novel. I gave away all my copies, on the street and at coffee shops and thrift stores and parks and one hair salon. Because the genius of Margaret Atwood’s books is that they are about so much more than their plots. They are about agency, and reproduction, and politics, and religion, and resistance movements. But ultimately, they are about who we are, and who we could be, and how maybe we should think very carefully about both those things.
The coolest part, I would imagine, is the feeling of holding in your hands the book to be given away, especially if it’s one you really love, and thinking about what that book (and, if you’ll permit a moment of grandeur, reading itself) has meant to you and might mean to this person to whom you’re bestowing it. It’s a moment of pure potential energy, like the few seconds on Christmas morning between waking up and swinging your feet over the bedside. I get the shivers just thinking about it.

All this WBN jealousy got me thinking about that moment and about the gesture of handing someone a beloved book, which led to a question: of all the books I’ve read, if I could only give out one book, which would it be and why?

The deadline is Friday. Here are several reasons you should sign up. 

As someone who participated last year, I’m speaking from firsthand experience when I say you really have to SELL these books. People think you’re trying to give them a Mormon bible or cult literature if you can’t sell it in a really quick sentence before they have time to walk away.

This year, I’m going to make, like, a lemonade stand or sandwich board fully explaining what World Book Night is and being very clear about the fact that I’m just trying to get good books in the hands of good people and am NOT trying to get anyone to join a Child Bride Cult in the Backwoods of Nowhereland .
aaknopf:

Taken with Instagram at Central Park

aaknopf:

Taken with Instagram at Central Park