BOOK RIOT
(via If George R.R. Martin Wrote Mad Men - Neatorama)
Critical Linking: April 15, 2014
Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee. 

The Grapes of Wrath, Steinbeck’s landmark novel of The Great Depression in the US, is 75 years old this week. Have you saved up enough knowledge to get through our quiz?

Take a shot at this quiz, okie.

__________________

Of course, this kind of luxury experience will set you back: the plays are $545 apiece, with a complete set weighing in at $21,335.

There are luxurious editions. Then there are head-scratchingly precious editions. And then there are these.

___________________

Dave Eggers’s latest novel will be published on June 17, just eight months after the appearance of his last, the social-media cautionary tale“The Circle.” The new book’s title is a two-sentence mouthful: “Your Fathers, Where Are They? And the Prophets, Do They Live Forever?”

You know you write novels fast when Joyce Carol Oates is all “Slow your roll, son!”

Who Said It: Richard Brautigan or Rust Cohle?

This one is pretty self-explanatory, kittens: Guess if the quote was said by literature’s handle-barred, troubled troubadour or True Detective‘s handle-barred, troubled homicide detective.

1. Sometimes life is merely a matter of coffee and whatever intimacy a cup of coffee affords.

2. I don’t sleep, I just dream.

3. Nothing’s ever fulfilled, not until the very end.

4. All of us have a place in history.

5. This place is like somebody’s memory of a town, and the memory is fading.

6. One day time will die and love will bury it.

7. I thought about it for awhile, hiding it from the rest of my mind.

8. They are pieces of distant life that have no form or meaning.

9. If the common good’s gotta make up fairy tales then it’s not good for anybody.

10. Finding is losing something else.

11. I’m in a constant process of thinking about things.

12. What happened in my head is not something that gets better.

13. Life’s barely long enough to get good at one thing. So be careful what you get good at.

14. World needs bad men.

15. What makes you older is when your bones, muscles and blood wear out, when the heart sinks into oblivion and all the houses you ever lived in are gone and people are not really certain that your civilization ever existed.

16. If you get hung up on everybody else’s hang-ups, then the whole world’s going to be nothing more than one huge gallows.

17. It’s strange how the simple things in life go on while we become more difficult.

18. The truth wills out, and everybody sees.

19. People incapable of guilt usually do have a good time.

20. I think human consciousness is a tragic misstep in evolution.

21. Our names were made for us in another century.

Check here to see how you did.

Critical Linking: April 14, 2014
Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee. 

So Kahn decided to read them, 100 years of No. 1 bestsellers, from 1913 to 2013, and post reviews on his blog, Kahn’s Corner. As of the time of this writing, he’s up to 1966 and Jacqueline Susann’s “The Valley of the Dolls.”

As reading projects go, this is a compelling one.

____________________________

There’s not enough information on just how much this pilot has increased ebook loans, but there is some early data to show that pilot is generating sales. In Derbyshire, for example, 464 ebooks were loaned in the first monitoring period, leading to about 20 sales to library patrons.  According to Cox, many of the patrons bought the ebook while they were  still only part of the way through reading the loaned ebook.

Only problem with this is there is no way to know how many ebooks library patrons would have bought had the ebooks not been available from the library.

____________________________

Catchphrases, jokes and expressions of outrage spring up, gain currency and become outmoded in the blink of an eye. How can a novelist capture a conversation that moves so fast, that seems to boast almost superfluous linguistic versatility? How can fiction reflect the subtle hierarchies and allegiances of the constantly mutating online crowd?

Good long piece on fiction and the internet.

mittenstrings140plus:

In honour of the wonderful Sue Townsend, I’ll be hosting a reread of the Adrian Mole books, beginning with THE SECRET DIARY OF ADRIAN MOLE AGED 13 3/4, starting here on my Tumblr on Saturday.
I do hope you’ll join me, whether you’ve read the books before or not. (If you haven’t, I’m genuinely jealous. You’re in for such a good time.)
Please feel free to reblog this if you’re interested. It’ll be fun to catch up with fellow Sue Townsend fans as we mourn her death and, far more importantly, celebrate her life and work.
So spend Friday tracking down your copy of THE SECRET DIARY or bugging your librarian for one, and I’ll meet you back here Saturday.

(Re)discover Sue Townsend!

mittenstrings140plus:

In honour of the wonderful Sue Townsend, I’ll be hosting a reread of the Adrian Mole books, beginning with THE SECRET DIARY OF ADRIAN MOLE AGED 13 3/4, starting here on my Tumblr on Saturday.

I do hope you’ll join me, whether you’ve read the books before or not. (If you haven’t, I’m genuinely jealous. You’re in for such a good time.)

Please feel free to reblog this if you’re interested. It’ll be fun to catch up with fellow Sue Townsend fans as we mourn her death and, far more importantly, celebrate her life and work.

So spend Friday tracking down your copy of THE SECRET DIARY or bugging your librarian for one, and I’ll meet you back here Saturday.

(Re)discover Sue Townsend!

What have you been reading this week? These are a few of our highlights. 

The List List #101
Critical Linking: April 11, 2014
Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee. 

Amazon.com today announced that it has reached an agreement to acquire comiXology, the company that revolutionized the digital comics reading experience with their immersive Guided View technology and makes discovering, buying, and reading comic books and graphic novels easier and more fun than ever before.

Big wheel keeps on turning.

____________________________

Your reviewer writes, “Claire Bloom, after her divorce from Philip Roth, said Updike’s negative review of Mr. Roth’s ‘Operation Shylock’ (1993) so distressed Mr. Roth that he checked himself into a psychiatric hospital.”

For the record, in the weeks and months immediately after Updike’s March 15, 1993, review of “Operation Shylock” in The New Yorker, I was teaching two classes in literature at Hunter College, giving readings from my book “Patrimony” in Lansing, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, Cambridge, South Orange and at the New York “Y,” and completing work on the first chapters of “Sabbath’s Theater.”

Boooooooom.

____________________________

A month after turning to fans for the first time to propose a new word for its Official Scrabble Players Dictionary, Hasbro revealed the winner: geocache.

Good choice.

____________________________

In terms of the canon, 81% of respondents claimed they’d read “Pride and Prejudice” and 73% “Moby-Dick” — but only 29% had taken on David Foster Wallace’s “Infinite Jest.” (However, 40% admitted that they’d lied about reading “Infinite Jest.” Even authors experience peer pressure.)

Even pro writers lie about reading Infinite Jest. A lot of them.