BOOK RIOT

Oct 17

Critical Linking: October 17, 2014 

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

We wanted to come up with a list that was more than just a general reflection of a place, but rather paid attention to the specifics, even at the risk of the exclusion of the whole. No one book, after all, can completely capture the spirit of something so unwieldy as a state. Few—if any—books can even completely capture the spirit of an individual. And yet there are those stories that so beautifully evoke a time and a place and a way of life that it becomes close to impossible to separate the literary perception of a place from its reality—one winds up informing the other.

A very thoughtful list of the best book from every state.

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A Texan Got Locked In A London Waterstones And Twitter Refused To Sleep Until He Was Freed

The harrowing saga of being locked in a bookstore for two hours.

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The new season of Twin Peaks will pick up 25 years after the show left off, but what happened to the denizens of Washington’s weirdest town in the interim? An upcoming book by Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost will reveal all—or at least as much as Twin Peaks ever reveals.

The last couple of weeks have been a veritable bonanza for Twin Peaks fans.

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Did you know that Book Riot has a YouTube channel? We do. It’s new and we are having fun with it. Check it out here.

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Oct 16

Have you checked out the site Literary Starbucks yet? 
Here’s why you should.

Have you checked out the site Literary Starbucks yet?

Here’s why you should.

“Every year, I take Wuthering Heights off my shelf and remember. I remember being In Love with the man who gave it to me. I remember everything that happened between us in the years after he gave me the book and before I went away to college. All of that is minor compared to the Heathcliff and Catherine-level—but healthy I swear—love for literature that book unleashed in me.” — from My Evolving, Totally Unhip Love for WUTHERING HEIGHTS

“In the meantime, this whole decision-making process really fucks with readers, and I would imagine writers as well. For example, I had never heard of Modiano before he won the Nobel, and that made me question my knowledge of writers from other countries. However, it seems a nearly impossible task for a writer to be ubiquitous in every nation. There are often notes in books mentioning if an author has been translated into many different languages, and I have to wonder if that goes into account when the Academy makes their selection.

To sum up so far, the Nobel potentially divides readers along the lines of literary merit and general worldliness.” — from Does The Nobel Prize Do a Disservice To Readers?

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“So, while we love to hear from authors, and love to know their inspirations, their frustrations, their moments of slamming a head on a keyboard, sometimes the questions should be paused and the books should just be read and written.” — from On Authors (Over)Sharing Their Writing Regrets by Jessi Lewis

“Of course we don’t need a new version of Pygmalion. We don’t need a new version of anything, if you think about it. However, classics are classics because their stories can be molded to fit a new age. Just look at the high school comedy 10 Things I Hate About You with Heath Ledger and Julia Stiles, based on Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew.” — from ABC’s Selfie vs. Shaw’s Pygmalion