BOOK RIOT

Jul 25

Critical Linking: July 25, 2014 

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

The brick-and-mortar survivors — and brave newcomers — have adapted to the Age of Amazon in their own ways, from opening 24 hours to undergoing spectacular design renovations or stocking books that aren’t sold by the online giant. Old or new, all with fascinating stories, the bookstores below serve as historic sites, sanctuaries, salons of culture and must-visit entries in any travel itinerary.

That is one gorgeous group of bookstores.

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Although, to be strictly accurate, crime writer Val McDermid was actually talking to “Robert Galbraith”, Rowling’s pseudonym (broken far more quickly than she had hoped) for two mystery novels about one-legged, ex-army private eye Cormoran Strike. In honour of her male alias, Rowling wore a suit and tie.

Maybe I am just never going to get the point of continuing the Galbraith charade.

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The Evanston Public Library’s new Book Bike took its first spin into the community on July 16 to enthusiastic response, checking out books and making new library cards by the City’s lakefront. This librarian-driven initiative will bring books, library card sign-ups, and program registration to parks, neighborhoods, and events around town. 

Good job, Evanston Public Library.

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Still prefer real books to e-readers—but hate having to lug them in your suitcase? Shutters on the Beach, the iconic Santa Monica hotel, is introducing a new Beach Book Bag program, allowing guests to order their beach reads before stepping foot on the plane. Just call the front desk up to 24 hours in advance of the scheduled check-in time, and the books will be bought at a local Barnes & Noble and waiting upon arrival.

I heartily approve of this service.

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Did you know that Book Riot has a YouTube channel? We do. It’s new and we are having fun with it. Check it out here.

Jul 24

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Mary Balogh’s heroes and heroines feel like actual characters, not just props for sex scenes. When the sexy parts do happen, they’re that much more fun because you actually know the characters and you’re rooting for them to get it on. Either that, or you get a super hot sex scene right away and then you have a whole novel to get to know the characters and root for them to get it on again. 
The heroines are complex and strong; they’re women with opinions who make their own decisions. They vary in personality and physical type, as do the heroes. The writing is smart, the banter is witty, and the romance is steamy.
— from My Fling with Romance by Becky Cole

Mary Balogh’s heroes and heroines feel like actual characters, not just props for sex scenes. When the sexy parts do happen, they’re that much more fun because you actually know the characters and you’re rooting for them to get it on. Either that, or you get a super hot sex scene right away and then you have a whole novel to get to know the characters and root for them to get it on again.

The heroines are complex and strong; they’re women with opinions who make their own decisions. They vary in personality and physical type, as do the heroes. The writing is smart, the banter is witty, and the romance is steamy.

— from My Fling with Romance by Becky Cole

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Take a peek over our shoulders and see what members of team Riot is reading right now.

Take a peek over our shoulders and see what members of team Riot is reading right now.

The problem with reading is that we are never talking about reading to learn, we are almost always talking about reading for pleasure, while at the same time nervously worrying about and sneering about the idea that reading is a fun and pleasurable activity instead of a higher calling. We’re very neurotic about this. We aren’t talking about reading a shelf of history books or psychology manuals, we’re talking novels…but what if they’re the wrong novels? Or what if they’re the right novels, but you don’t read them in the right way? Or what if you read Dickens, but you keep wandering off to watch goofy shit on the internet (That’s me).

What winds up happening is, we worry and grumble about people not reading, then turn around and worry and grumble about the sanctity and power of reading, and the way we must approach it with reverence or it might not count or something. And essentially what this does is suck all the pleasure out of reading.

” — from We Love and We Hate Reading For Pleasure by Peter Damien

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