BOOK RIOT

Aug 31

After spending their workdays searching for the next Great American Novel or nonfiction masterpiece, editors treat their pleasure-reading time like gold. So, they choose their books wisely. In part two of this blog post (see the first installment here), editors from publishing houses around the country let us peek at their personal reading lists and TBR piles.
— from What Do Editors Read? Part 2 by Margret Aldrich

After spending their workdays searching for the next Great American Novel or nonfiction masterpiece, editors treat their pleasure-reading time like gold. So, they choose their books wisely. In part two of this blog post (see the first installment here), editors from publishing houses around the country let us peek at their personal reading lists and TBR piles.

— from What Do Editors Read? Part 2 by Margret Aldrich

Grab your maps and your shoes. We’re taking a trip this week through the Great Plains and doing some literary tourism.

Grab your maps and your shoes. We’re taking a trip this week through the Great Plains and doing some literary tourism.

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Snap up one of our awesome READ READ READ tees and sport the best in bookish fashion. For under $20 (that includes shipping!), wear that reading pride proudly.

Snap up one of our awesome READ READ READ tees and sport the best in bookish fashion. For under $20 (that includes shipping!), wear that reading pride proudly.

Critical Linking: August 31, 2014 

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

But with “Fault,” Fox’s homevideo division is specifically reaching out to 13 to 17-year-old girls and women over 18 with an extended cut of the film on most digital platforms three weeks before its disc is available to purchase through traditional retailers on Sept. 16.

Around 75% of “Fault’s” audience on opening weekend was largely under 25 and female (around 80%), according to Fox. And CinemaScore found that 52% of the audience consisted of females under 18; females under 25 made up 69% of ticket buyers.

The Fault in Our Stars being released digitally three weeks early in hopes of enticing teens to buy it that way first. Interesting.

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Bruce Springsteen has teamed up with writer and cartoonist Frank Caruso to transform his 2009 song “Outlaw Pete” into a children’s book. “When Bruce wrote ‘Outlaw Pete’ he didn’t just write a great song, he created a great character,” Caruso said in a statement. “The first time I heard the song this book played out in my head.” The book will hit shelves on November 4th.

The Boss wrote a children’s book, though it’s not entirely clear whether it’s really meant for children.

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There is an endless list of components that make up the framework of our individual identities. In growing up and coming of age, one of life’s toughest questions is challenged: “Who am I?”

With this in mind, one of the most significant benefits of reading books in childhood is that it encourages you to consider this in the first place. Reading offers countless advantages from helping children to learn language and broaden their vocabulary to encouraging them to develop hobbies and understand different cultures and points of view. Studies have even shown that reading for pleasure when young can have a greater influence on the child’s success in school than their economic or social background.

Speaking of children’s books, they’re pretty powerful when it comes to identity formation for young readers. I would venture to guess the same can be said about adult readers who read these books, too.

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With the long weekend, perhaps there’s no better time to binge read these 25 superhero comics.

Aug 30

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Can’t sleep?
Struggling with insomnia?
Then you’ll want to check out some of the books on this list.

Can’t sleep?

Struggling with insomnia?

Then you’ll want to check out some of the books on this list.

Aging parents? Elder care?
Roz Chast’s graphic memoir navigates the tricky world of taking care of her parents as they get older with equal parts humor and horror.

Aging parents? Elder care?

Roz Chast’s graphic memoir navigates the tricky world of taking care of her parents as they get older with equal parts humor and horror.

How about a giveaway?
Up for grabs this weekend are 10 copies of Jeaniene Frost’s The Beautiful Ashes.

How about a giveaway?

Up for grabs this weekend are 10 copies of Jeaniene Frost’s The Beautiful Ashes.

The Week’s Most Popular Posts: August 25 - 29, 2014 

A look back at the week that was here at Book Riot …

While most people know about the heavy-hitting YA movies that were made into films, including The Hunger Games, The Fault in Our Stars, Divergent, and the upcoming The Maze Runner, none of these are firsts in the category to make the leap from page to screen. There are quite a few YA books that have gotten the film treatment.

If you spend a little time digging around, you can find many of them available through Netflix, most often on DVD. But here’s a look at three YA books you can watch in their movie form on Netflix instant right now. 

from 3 On A YA Theme: YA Films on Netflix Instant by Kelly Jensen

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What I’m trying to say is, teaching what I love wasn’t the dream I thought it would be. I learned to come down to the level of reality when necessary, and navigate the different spheres of my life according to my responsibilities. Even at my most frustrated moment, though, my love of reading never waned. And now that I’m fortunate enough to have time to read each day (without it being the middle of the night), my joy has only increased with the contemporary writers whom I’ve finally discovered for myself.

from The Joys and Sorrows of Teaching Literature by Rachel Cordasco

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Discoverability is a real problem when it comes to finding great, diverse book club picks. There just aren’t a ton of minority authors who are household names, and those who are? Well, you’ve probably been there, done that. It’s so much easier to fall back on the latest Jennifer Weiner or Ian McEwan than it actually is to go out and find a book by an author you’ve never heard of and risk your book club hating you for all time because it sucked.

Well, don’t worry. I AM HERE FOR YOU. And I’m going to give you some suggestions for some awesome books by minorities that you should consider for your next book club pick. All of these are currently available in paperback and aren’t more than 400 pages (important for a lot of book clubs!)

from Book Club Suggestions If Your Most Diverse Pick Was The Help by Swapna Krisnha

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It is that time of year when our local stores are running Back to School sales on everything from pencils to dorm room essentials. If you are like me, you might find yourself staring nostalgically at the mountains of notebooks sitting at the front of your local Target, dreamily thinking about those good ol’ college days. So if you want to re-live those college years through the stories of others, then grab your cup of ramen and dive into these books.

from Back to School: 10 Books For Reliving Those College Days by Rincey Abraham

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As readers, we often like to say that reading makes us more empathetic people: that because we read, we can put ourselves in the lives and hearts of other people. That ability to crawl inside the experiences of people who have different lives from us is one of the reasons why diversity in literature is so important. While everyone is thinking about Robin Williams’ suicide in the wake of his struggles with depression, I thought I would take the opportunity to recommend three books that explore what it is to live with suicidal thoughts and depression. Because the only way to combat stigma is with empathy.

from What We Talk About When We Talk About Suicide: Books About Depression by Brenna Clarke Gray