BOOK RIOT
How about a giveaway?
Up for grabs are the titles in this month’s mailbag. 10 books to one lucky winner.
Go ahead, try your luck.

How about a giveaway?

Up for grabs are the titles in this month’s mailbag. 10 books to one lucky winner.

Go ahead, try your luck.

A Tail of Two Kitties- War, love, courage, two cats that for some reason look a whole lot alike: what more could you ask for in a novel.
— from If Cats Wrote Books by Rachel Cordasco

A Tail of Two Kitties- War, love, courage, two cats that for some reason look a whole lot alike: what more could you ask for in a novel.

— from If Cats Wrote Books by Rachel Cordasco

We asked for your favorite romances based on misunderstandings. Here are your top 22 picks.

Critical Linking: September 2, 2014 

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee. 

Following two years of unpaid work, in 1917 Christie qualified as an apothecaries’ assistant and received an annual wage of £16 (equivalent to around $1300/£800 today) until the end of the War. She later drew on her knowledge of pharmaceuticals in many of her novels, the first of which, Hercule Poirot’s Mysterious Affair At Styles, was published in America in 1920, and in the UK in 1921.

These “bizarre” day jobs of famous authors seem pretty normal to me: just people trying to get by.

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Fans of the beloved children’s classic may not get everything they want, but they are getting a previously unpublished chapter from the book that turns 50 this month.

Ohhhh, an unpublished chapter of Charlie & the Chocolate Factory!

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Eleanor Catton, the youngest ever winner of the Man Booker prize, has announced that she will put the money from her latest awards win towards establishing a grant that will give writers “time to read”.

Can we get a grant giving readers time to read? I could use that.
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Can we interest you in a bookish t-shirt that not-so-subtly displays your love of reading? Can be yours for less than $20, shipping included. Get it here.

After spending their workdays searching for the next Great American Novel or nonfiction masterpiece, editors treat their pleasure-reading time like gold. So, they choose their books wisely. In part two of this blog post (see the first installment here), editors from publishing houses around the country let us peek at their personal reading lists and TBR piles.
— from What Do Editors Read? Part 2 by Margret Aldrich

After spending their workdays searching for the next Great American Novel or nonfiction masterpiece, editors treat their pleasure-reading time like gold. So, they choose their books wisely. In part two of this blog post (see the first installment here), editors from publishing houses around the country let us peek at their personal reading lists and TBR piles.

— from What Do Editors Read? Part 2 by Margret Aldrich

Grab your maps and your shoes. We’re taking a trip this week through the Great Plains and doing some literary tourism.

We want to know….how do you get into a new genre? Come talk with us about it over on our YouTube channel.

Snap up one of our awesome READ READ READ tees and sport the best in bookish fashion. For under $20 (that includes shipping!), wear that reading pride proudly.

Snap up one of our awesome READ READ READ tees and sport the best in bookish fashion. For under $20 (that includes shipping!), wear that reading pride proudly.

Critical Linking: August 31, 2014 
Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

But with “Fault,” Fox’s homevideo division is specifically reaching out to 13 to 17-year-old girls and women over 18 with an extended cut of the film on most digital platforms three weeks before its disc is available to purchase through traditional retailers on Sept. 16.

Around 75% of “Fault’s” audience on opening weekend was largely under 25 and female (around 80%), according to Fox. And CinemaScore found that 52% of the audience consisted of females under 18; females under 25 made up 69% of ticket buyers.

The Fault in Our Stars being released digitally three weeks early in hopes of enticing teens to buy it that way first. Interesting.

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Bruce Springsteen has teamed up with writer and cartoonist Frank Caruso to transform his 2009 song “Outlaw Pete” into a children’s book. “When Bruce wrote ‘Outlaw Pete’ he didn’t just write a great song, he created a great character,” Caruso said in a statement. “The first time I heard the song this book played out in my head.” The book will hit shelves on November 4th.

The Boss wrote a children’s book, though it’s not entirely clear whether it’s really meant for children.

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There is an endless list of components that make up the framework of our individual identities. In growing up and coming of age, one of life’s toughest questions is challenged: “Who am I?”

With this in mind, one of the most significant benefits of reading books in childhood is that it encourages you to consider this in the first place. Reading offers countless advantages from helping children to learn language and broaden their vocabulary to encouraging them to develop hobbies and understand different cultures and points of view. Studies have even shown that reading for pleasure when young can have a greater influence on the child’s success in school than their economic or social background.

Speaking of children’s books, they’re pretty powerful when it comes to identity formation for young readers. I would venture to guess the same can be said about adult readers who read these books, too.

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With the long weekend, perhaps there’s no better time to binge read these 25 superhero comics.